Daily Banking Industry News
Wednesday 07th of January 2009

Banking Sectors:

By company:

By organisation:

Also see:

August 7, 2008

Halifax to ditch Howard as adverts sober up

by Gill Montia

Story link: Halifax to ditch Howard as adverts sober up

Halifax is looking to project a new image in its advertisements, one that is more in keeping with the credit crisis.

The lender has become synonymous with its singing and dancing employee, Howard Brown, who took the leading role in the bank’s “staff as stars” campaign when it was launched eight years ago.

The account is handled by advertising agency, DLKW, which hails the “staff as stars” campaign as a resounding success.

However, the credit crisis is now dictating a change and the bespectacled Mr Brown, who has even appeared in computer generated form in Halifax advertisements, may return to his desk or pursue a career in the media.

He has already made a cameo performance in the BBC 2 series, “The Office”.

Mr Brown will perhaps be best remembered for his reworked version of Tom Jones’ “Sex Bomb”.

He also turned in a reasonable version of “Singing in the Rain”, the song and dance routine immortalised by Gene Kelly.

 

Add to Bookmarks:

ADD TO NETSCAPE     ADD TO DEL.ICIO.US     ADD TO DIGG     ADD TO FURL

ADD TO STUMBLEUPON     ADD TO YAHOO MYWEB     ADD TO GOOGLE     ADD TO SPURL


Related stories to: Halifax to ditch Howard as adverts sober up

Halifax offers up to 12% on Regular Saver  ...

Halifax ignores government calls for cut  ...

Halifax cuts overdraft fees with Reward current account  ...

Halifax hire Experian to trace dormant account holders  ...

Halifax Tempts Current Account Switchers  ...

No Comments »

No comments yet.

Leave a comment


Previous: « Base rate held at 5%
Next: Savings rates hit seven-year high »

Visited 543 times, 1 so far today


Savings & Investment News

Savings & Investment News
Savers suffer as base rate cut brings some joy to borrowers

Borrowing & Lending News

Borrowing & Lending News
Savers suffer as base rate cut brings some joy to borrowers